Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

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VTRDark
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Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by VTRDark » Tue May 07, 2013 12:04 am

Part One

Disclaimer
Every effort has been made to ensure that this guide is as accurate as possible, by following this guide you will doing so at your own risk. If you feel that you do not have the capabilities for the job then please seek the help of a professional mechanic. In no event will this forum or myself be held liable for any damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential damage that may possibly occur.


OK that's that out the way so lets get started.

First off there are alternative ways and methods to fitting manual cam chain tensioners that don't require the removal of the front cam cover but I feel this is the most foolproof and accurate way to go about things. As long as you are pretty handy with a spanner and comfortable with doing the odd bit of mechanical work, then by following this guide even a complete novice is capable of this task. One of the biggest problems for most people is going into the unknown and the nervousness of timing knowing that if it's done incorrectly then it can possibly cause serious engine damage.

As both cam covers are being removed for this job you may also want to take a little extra time to check the valve clearances. Valve clearances should be checked while the cylinder that your working on is at TDC on the Compression stroke. For more information on valve clearances please refer to the workshop manual. You will find a downloadable copy of the Honda workshop manual here

Read through this guide completely first before attempting anything and if you have any questions or are unsure about something then please ask beforehand. When doing the work, take your time and double check everything before moving forward to the next stage.

The following link is a copy of this guide in PDF format so it can printed off to refer to whilst doing the work or to view locally on other devices.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/eu3gujutqgnat ... T.pdf?dl=0

Note some of the pictures within this guide will be on an engine that is not mounted in the frame and will be used for clarity. As you can appreciate it is not always easy to take accurate pictures while the engine is in place on the motorcycle.

Before you start anything make sure that the generator caps come undone, the timing hole inspection cap and crankshaft end cap. These have a nasty habit of seizing in place and can turn into a job in itself to remove if seized in place. Be careful when undoing them as the caps are made out of an extremely soft alloy and can round of easily if the hex socket is not securely in place.

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Total Job completion time should be around 2.5 hours.

Start with stripping everything down so you have access to both cylinder heads. Unfortunately this is what takes most of the time, it should take about an hour to remove everything required.

Note if you have later facelift modal VTR1000 Firestorm with the digital dash and 19L fuel tank then the fuel tank and airbox arrangement will be slightly different. Please refer to the following guide if you have one of these modals.
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=21058


Remove Front Fairing and Fuel Tank
1. Remove both mirrors which are held in place by two 10mm nuts and lift the mirrors off.
2. Disconnect both front indicators from inside the fairing. These will be tucked in towards the front on the inside of the fairing and may be held by a bendy metal tab at the front towards the bottom of the headlight. They will be a bullet and receptacle (male and female) type electrical connectors that you can just pull apart. Try to pull them by the connectors and not the wires otherwise you risk pulling the wire out from the connector.
3. Remove the two hex head fairing mounting screws from each side of the fairing with a 5mm allen key or hex socket.
4. You should now be able to pull the fairing as one unit forward enough and disconnect the sidelight and headlight connectors.
5. Lift the remainder of the fairing off being careful by radiators and not to catch the fairing on the side fairing brackets. You will have to pull the sides of the fairing away slightly to lift them past. Note the position of the inner fairings how they slide around the radiators and the electrical connector at the front of the right hand side radiator. It will be on your left if facing the motorcycle from the front.
6. You should be able to remove the fairing as one complete unit. If it's a struggle then you may also have to loosen the two screws at the front of the fairing just underneath the headlight between the forks.

1. Remove the seat out of the way.
2. Remove the two 8mm mounting bolts from the front of the fuel tank. Note the top hat washers under the bolts and don't loose these.
3. Disconnect the fuel level sender wire from the main wiring harness in front of the battery.
4. Prop the tank up from the front so it hinges on the rear mounting bolt. Watch you don't loose the two rubber mounting blocks ether side at the base of the tank. Then disconnect the breather and overflow pipes from underneath the tank.
5. Turn of the fuel petcock with an 8mm spanner and disconnect both fuel hoses and vacuum pipe from the petcock. Note the vacuum pipe is connected on the outlet just behind the left hand side fuel hose.
6. Lower the tank back down and remove the rear mounting bolt with a 10mm ratchet and 10mm spanner. Don't undo the Nut completely and undo the last bit with your fingers so you don't loose the nut, then pull the bolt through the tank and mounting bracket.
7. lift the tank of the bike being carful to also lift the plastic drip flap off the rear mounting that sits around the petcock area and over the mount. Note how it folds around onto the mounting bracket.

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Remove Airbox and Carburettors
1. Remove the screws that hold the airbox lid in place. You may need a magnetic pick up tool to help lift the front two out so you don't loose them. Then lift the lid and airfilter off and out the way. You will have to lift from the rear and pull rearward and give it a wiggle so the front air intake can pull through from the front of the frame.
2. Undo the two screws from each Velocity stack and remove. Note the short one is at the front and the little indicator marks (two little arrows) at mounting and on the base of the airbox.

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3. Under the velocity stacks you will have eight screws on that hold the airbox to the top of the carbs. Remove these being careful not to drop them inside the carb throat.
4. The airbox is now held by two breather hoses, one each side diagonally apart. They are held by metal clips that can be squeezed and lowered out of the way so that the hose can be pulled from the airbox. The front may be a bit fiddly to get to but you should be able to lift the box enough and get you hand underneath to disconnect it.
5. The airbox is now only held by an air hose on each carb. Give the airbox a tug upwards and it should pop off from these hoses so you can remove it completely. Stuff some rag or kitchen towel inside the carbs to stop any dust or dirt falling in.

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1. Now onto carburettor removal. First disconnect the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) electrical connector from the rear carb, and while you at it remove the cable from the clip on the side of the plastic cowl.
2. Undo both throttle cables with a 10mm spanner and note how they are connected and which way around they go.
3. Loosen the choke cable at the frame and slide out sideways from the mounting bracket, you will notice that the threaded part is cut in a way that you can twist it around and slide it out.

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4. Loosen off the top clamps from the carb inlet rubbers. These can be undone with a Philips screwdriver. For the front carb you can get to it from the right hand side of the bike through the hole in the side of the plastic cowl above the radiator (see in the above pic below TPS cable). The rear one can be accessed from the top from the left hand side of the bike near the carb diaphragm cap and choke cable. Also note how the rear carb choke cable is routed over the top and around the side of the carbs. Once the clips are loose you can wiggle the carbs from side to side as you pull up and they will pop out from the inlet rubbers.
5. Now to remove the two water inlet pipes, there's no need to drain the cooling system as you will only loose a teaspoon of fluid. Lean the carbs over toward the right of the bike and you will see the front hose. Squeeze the clip with a pair of pliers and lower it down the hose out the way and gently pull/pry/wiggle the hose of the front carb. Now for the rear, tip the carbs over to the left and do the same for the rear hose.
6. The carbs can now be lifted out and away from the bike, but you will have to feed the choke cable through and out from underneath the two coolant hoses that run to the thermostat housing and along the side of the coolant bottle. Once the carbs have been removed put them somewhere safe where they wont get any dust or dirt inside them. Also stuff some old rags inside the engine inlets to stop dirt or anything falling inside.

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7. Now to remove the plastic cowl to gain access to the front cam cover. Remove the three trim clips that hold it in place. There will be one either side of the frame and one on the front right of the frame from underneath that holds the smaller piece in place where the throttle cable feeds through. Also note there is a small cut out at the bottom for the TPS cable to run through.

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8. Once the clips have been removed pull the smaller piece by the throttle cables off and out the way, note how it clips in to the large piece. Then lifting the cowl up from the rear it should pop off past the front carb inlet rubber and you can poke the front breather hose through the hole, then puling the cowl towards the rear of the bike it will slide off the front of the frame so you can remove it.

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Remove Spark Plugs
1. By removing the plugs it helps later when it comes to turning the engine over and setting the timing as you wont be fighting against the compression. Pull the HT leads off and you will need a 12mm plug spanner (there should be one in the Honda toolkit if you have one under the seat) or you can use an 18mm deep socket if the outer circumference is smaller enough to fit down inside the channel. Note that plug spanners are measured by thread size not the hex attachment.

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Front Cam Cover Removal
1. Remove the two 8mm mounting bolts from the top of each radiator which gives you more access to the cover and makes viewing the cams easier as you can pull them out the way.

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2. It's not entirely necessary but for the sake of two 10mm bolts you may as well remove the bottom mounting bolt off each radiator as it frees everything up more and the oil cooler lines don't get caught on them.

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3. Remove the two 8mm oil cooler mounting bolts, you will have to lift the coolant hose out the way to access them. Then pull the oil cooler down out the way being carful with the oil cooler lines. You should now have access to the bottom two cam cover bolts.

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4. Remove the four 10mm cam cover bolts. They have a rubber washer seal on them. Sometimes these will remain in the cover or they will get stuck to the bolt, so be carful not to loose these. Note they are marked UP on one side.

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5. You will have to remove the breather hose from the cam cover to be able to lift the cover off and under the frame. You will then be able to manipulate the cover up and forward and off the bike from the front. Be careful not to damage the rubber gasket.

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Rear Cam Cover Removal
1. The rear cover is far more simple. Remove the four 10mm bolts from the top not forgetting the rubber washer seals and lift the cover off being careful of the rubber gasket.

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That's the worst of it done and with both cam covers removed you have access to everything.

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Right, it's about time for a well deserved Tea/Coffee break before starting on the timing and fitting of your manual tensioners.

(:-})
Last edited by VTRDark on Tue May 07, 2013 3:20 pm, edited 6 times in total.
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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by VTRDark » Tue May 07, 2013 12:05 am

Part Two

OK Tea break over, lets get started on the timing and fitting of manual tensioners. This should take you about 30mins to complete.

Starting with the Rear Cylinder
The aim here is to set the rear cylinder at Top Dead Centre (TDC) on the Compression stroke so the cam chain is at it's slackest point and it's safe to remove the old tensioner without the cam chain jumping any teeth on the cam sprockets.

1. With a 17mm socket turn the crankshaft end bolt from where the centre cap mounted on the generator cover, in an anti-clockwise direction only until the RT mark lines up with the scribed line along the inside edge of the thread that the inspection cap screws into. You need to look straight on at eye level through the inspection hole and you will see the alignment mark just under the T. You may find a torch comes in useful to shine in the hole as it's not always to clear.

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2. You now have to verify whether or not you are on the compression stroke as the RT lines up on other strokes. To do this have a look at the cam lobe positions and they should be pointing upwards and inwards. If they are not then keep turning in an anti clockwise direction 360 degrees until the RT alignment mark comes around again, and again check the positions of the cam lobes.

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3. With the crankshaft on RT and cam lobes pointing upwards and inwards it's time to check the camshafts are at exact alinement by looking at the alignment marks on each cam sprocket. This would be essential if you have had a previous CCT failure as it's likely that the chain has jumped some teeth. You will see an RI (rear inlet) and RE (rear exhaust) with a horizontal line on each sprocket and these should align on the outside edge horizontal with the top of the cylinder head.

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It's difficult to get to eye level and check the precision of these marks while the engine is on the motorcycle as the frame and other components sometimes get in the way. It's a good idea to lay a straight edge along the top of the cylinder head as a guide. If either of these are out of alignment then it will require removing the cam cap to turn whichever cam and sprocket around however many teeth it is out of alignment by. Note re-alining the cams can only be done once the chain guide and the old tensioner (CCT) has been removed and the chain is as slack as it can go.

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4. Remove the three bolts that hold the cam guide in place between the two cam sprockets. Before undoing any of these it's a good idea to stuff some old rag down the gaps in the engine case so you do not accidentally drop a bolt inside the engine. Do not drop anything inside the engine. Then remove the 10mm bolt from the front and the two longer bolts from the inside on the corner of the cam caps. You may also want to temporally cable tie the chain to each cam sprocket as a precaution while removing the old tensioner (CCT) to stop the chain from possibly jumping any teeth. These can be removed once the CCT has been removed. As long as everything is in alignment this should not be a problem along with slowly removing the tensioner squarely off.

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5. You can now remove the old Tensioner (CCT) from the engine casing. Undo the bolts a bit at a time alternating from one side to the other. Once the bolts are undone about one or two centimetres then you may have to give the end of the tensioner a light tap with a hammer or something to break the seal where the gasket is stuck to the casing. Once the seal is broken you can then continue to undo the bolts a bit at a time still alternating from side to side so it comes out squarely. It may drip a small amount of oil out from it so you may want to place a rag directly underneath.

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6. Now the tensioner (CCT) is completely removed the chain will be as slack as it can be. Now is the time to reposition the cams or chain on the sprocket teeth if anything was out of alignment earlier on. If repositioning anything make sure that the chain is pulled taught on the opposite side to the tensioner and all the slack is on the side of the tensioner as this is where the slack is taken up once the manual tensioner is tightened up.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foUrSHbquXQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foUrSHbquXQ

7 If using a new paper gasket with the manual tensioner then you will have to clean up the old gasket off the surface first being careful not to drop any bits into the hole. If using a gasket sealant or high temperature silicone then there is no need and it can be applied straight over the top. Personally I prefer to use sealant as it saves time and I would use it with the paper gasket anyway for a better seal.
8. Before fitting the manual tensioner loosen it off (unscrew the main threaded part) as much as it will go. If using sealant then apply some around the outside of the ring at the base where it inserts into the engine, place in the hole then fit and tighten up fully the mounting bolts. Don't forget the engine earth strap if it is taken off from one of these mounting bolts. If any sealant squiges out it can now be wiped off the outside.
9. Apply some sealant or threadlock along the base of the thread and around the area the locknut tightens up to. I prefer to use gasket seal as threadlock has a tendency to crack after some time. Be generous with the amount you use. This does two things, first it seals inside the orifice that the thread goes through to prevent any oil creeping through along the thread, and second, it helps to stop the locknut becoming loose from vibrations and also helps slow down the thread from undoing if it does happen to become loose. As long as the locknut is locked off tight enough then generally this should not be a problem but it's a good precautionary measure to take.
10. You now want to tighten the threaded part of the tensioner down until you have between 5 - 7mm of up and down play from the outside edge of the cam chain between the two cam sprockets. That's a total of 5 - 7mm from one side of the chain. It's a similar process to tightening the slack in your drive chain. I personally prefer to be on the slack side as it's going to put less stress and strain on engine components than if it's overtightened.

Image

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bnGIYz2awE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bnGIYz2awE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw7r1XUwxoM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw7r1XUwxoM

11. Once your happy with the tension lock down the tensioner locknut being carful not to move the threaded bolt part and upset the adjustment. Once locked off double check you measurements and clean of an sealant that may have squiged out.

Image

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFauZkUxOM8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFauZkUxOM8

12. Your have now completed the rear cylinder so re-fit the chain guide back in place and it's time to move onto the front.

Front Cylinder
The front cylinder is pretty much the same procedure as the rear except the timing now has to be repositioned on FT for Front Top Dead Centre on the compression stroke and the camshaft lobes will be the reverse from the rear and pointing upwards and away from each other.

1. Once again using the 17mm socket on the crankshaft end bolt through where the centre cap was on the generator cover, turn the crankshaft in an anti-clockwise direction only, 450 degrees (one and quarter turns) until the FT lines up with the alignment marks through the inspection window. You will find the FT comes around once and then on the second time you see it you would have turned it 450 degrees and be on the compression stroke. You will also find the FT comes around directly after an F mark, be careful to stop on the right one. If you miss the mark, then go around once again remembering that the FT comes into view once and it's the second time that it comes into view that you stop, so your essentially going around twice and always turn in an anti-clockwise direction.

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2. Check the positions of the cam lobes and if your on the compression stroke then they will be pointing upwards and away from each other. If not, then you will have to keep turning until the FT comes around again and the alignment marks line up. You should now be at Top Dead Centre on the compression stroke.

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3.Once your happy that all alignment marks line up you can then check the markings on the end of the cam sprockets as you did with the rear. The only difference is that instead of RI and RE they wilt be FI (Front Inlet) and FE (Front Exhaust). These should align on the outside edge horizontally against the top of the cylinder head.

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4. These markings are even harder to see than the rear so once again a straight edge helps. Once you happy, cable tie off if you wish and poke some rags down inside the engine and remove the chain guide.
5. It is now safe to remove the front Cam Chain Tensioner (CCT). Follow the same procedure as for the rear and fit the manual tensioner and you are done.
6. Once complete turn the engine over a couple of revolutions at the crankshaft to make sure that everything is turning freely without any problems..
7. Put the generator caps back in place. It's a good idea to put some copper slip or grease around the threads to help prevent them seizing in the future.

I think it's about time for another Tea /Coffee break.

(:-})
Last edited by VTRDark on Mon May 30, 2016 5:27 pm, edited 7 times in total.
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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by VTRDark » Tue May 07, 2013 12:06 am

Part Three

OK Tea break over, time to start putting everything back together.

Putting everything back together is the reversal of stripping it all down. Don't forget to remove any rags from inside the engine and refit both chain guides. You may want to put a bit of gasket or silicone in places around the cam cover rubber gaskets to hold them in place while refitting the cam covers. Be extra carful around the U shape around the plug area and where the seal can drop out at the front and rear as you tighten them up. Also make sure that the half moon shapes at the sides fit snugly in place. When tightening down the cam cover bolts do not over-tighten them as they are only going into aluminium shafts and they can snap off easily if too much force is used. Don't forgot the rubber washer seals and make sure they are the right way around with the UP on top.

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Once the cam covers are both back on, don't forget the front breather pipe, you can then refit the oil cooler, radiators, plastic cowl and put the plugs and HT lead back on.

When putting the carbs back on put a smear of grease around the inside on the carb inlet rubbers to help slide them back into place. When pushing them back on start with the front and push down gently on the rear, you should hear them pop into place. Before this though make sure you reconnect the two coolant hose and slide the choke cable back through alongside the coolant bottle and under the coolant hoses and back towards the mounting bracket on the frame. Don't forget the rear choke cable runs over the top and to the side. When putting the throttle cables back on start with the bottom one tighten it up and then put the top one on. Adjust the top cable so you left with about 2-6mm free play at the throttle grip. Don't forget to re-connect the TPS. Slide the choke cable back onto the bracket at the frame and tighten it up so that the choke slides in and out freely without slipping back in when pulled out.

With the airbox it can be a bit fiddly to connect the front breather and air hose, you best to do these first by lowering the front of the airbox at an angle and doing from underneath, then placing the airbox down onto the carbs, connecting the rear air hose. Then tighten down the eight screws that attach the airbox to the top of the carbs. Be careful with these and do not cross thread or over-tighten them as it will damage the soft ally body of the carbs. Once the airbox is secure you should just be able to slip your hand in front of the bar that runs across the frame and under the airbox to check the hoses are still connected and haven't popped off. Once this is done connect the rear breather hose back up to the airbox. You can now put the velocity stacks back in, short one on the front, and make sure they are aligned up with the alignment arrows. Then put the air filter and lid back on the airbox. Use a magnetic pick up tool to help get the front two screws into the holes. Use the tip of the screwdriver to hold them in place while you pull the magnet away.

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To put the tank back on first slide the plastic drip flap over the rear mounting bracket and place the tank on. Slide the 10mm nut and bolt through the rear tank bracket and prop the front of the tank up. You can then re-connect both fuel lines to the petcock and re-connect the vacuum pipe that goes on the outlet towards the rear right behind the left fuel hose. Connect the breather and overflow pipe back on and don't forget to turn the petcock back on with an 8mm spanner. Re-connect the fuel light electrical connector in front of the battery and once this is complete you can lower the tank down, put the rubber mounting blocks back on the bottom, put the top hat washers back in place and tighten the two 8mm mounting nuts and 10mm rear mounting bolt.

Be careful when sliding the front fairing back onto the bike and don't catch you bodywork on the mounting brackets or the electrical connector on the from side of the right hand radiator (left if facing the motorcycle from the front). Once the fairing is almost in place, reach you hand up behind the headlight and re-connect the sidelight and headlight connectors. You can now slide the fairing fully into place so the little rubber dimples slide through the holes on the front fairing mounting bracket around the four corner areas of the rear of the headlight. Re-connect the two hex head bolts either side if the fairing and put the mirrors back on. Then re-connect the indicator wires, poke them down out the way and push the bendy tab at the front back down to hold the wires in place so they don't drop loose.

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Put the seat back on, ignition on, and nervously (it always is at first) push the starter button. You should have no excess rattles from the cam chains though you may hear them slightly. As the bike warms up to full running temperature this should quieten down as things expand from the heat. Please note that an engine with Manual Cam Chain Tensioners does sound slightly different from the Honda auto tensioners, so you will have to get used to the slight different tone of the engine.

Well done, Job complete and no more worries about CCT's failing and causing engine damage. Manual tensioners normally will not require any adjustment for around 16,000 to 20,000 miles. A good time to check them is when the service intervals come up for checking your valve clearances as there is a likelihood you will have to slacken them off at that time anyway.

That wasn't too bad was it……

(:-})
Last edited by VTRDark on Tue May 07, 2013 12:29 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by VTRDark » Tue May 07, 2013 12:06 am

I will kindly ask you to please keep this thread on topic and strictly to questions regarding the above guide and fitting of manual cam chain tensioners.


For any chit chat, suggestions or amendments that need to be made regarding this guide please use the following thread viewtopic.php?f=7&t=28584


Thank you for your co-operation


(:-})
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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by seb421 » Tue May 07, 2013 12:35 am

Great write up buddy :thumbup:

it might be worth mentioning that people can zip tie the chain to the cam sprocket before taking out the CCT to help stop any jump or sudden movement etc

also printing i've always used the button on the forum

viewtopic.php?f=31&t=28583&view=print
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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by tattoo » Tue May 07, 2013 12:14 pm

Great write-up carl

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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by darkember » Tue May 07, 2013 5:32 pm

Great writeup, just one point & that is to put the rags in the carb throats after the stacks have been removed before unbolting the airbox. Otherwise spot on :thumbup: :thumbup:

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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by tattoo » Sat May 11, 2013 4:37 pm

Can I just say you don't have to remove the carbs or the cover underneath them to get the front cam cover off,I used a quarter drive socket set to take out the 4 bolts and once the breather pipe is off they will come past and out and the cover will come out out too...you don't have to balance the carbs or worry ifthey're in the rubbers right either

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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by VTRDark » Sat May 11, 2013 5:04 pm

I have never tried that. It sounds like making hard work for oneself. How did you reach the rear bolts with the cowl there as you cant get through from the front as the bar that runs across the frame is in the way. You might be able to get the plastic cowl out without removing the carbs but you would have to severely bend/twist/force it out which would make it even harder work when all it takes is 5 minutes, if that, just to pop the carbs off.

It's not totally necessary to balance/sync the carbs and they will more than likely be the same, but if your doing it by the book they should be checked after any time carbs are removed.

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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by tattoo » Sat May 11, 2013 5:41 pm

you can get in and the bolts and cover will come out...don't forget i have to do things one handed so i have to adapt the way i do things...that was the easiest way i have found to do it without taking the carbs off and struggling to get them back into the rubbers..

that reminds me...i have to balance the carbs,it's been a while since i did it last

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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by Hairy biker » Sun May 19, 2013 8:26 pm

:thumbup:
Last edited by Hairy biker on Sat May 25, 2013 9:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by VTRDark » Sun May 19, 2013 9:04 pm

Did you forget to write something there Hairy biker or was you just quoting me. :confused

Tip for in the future: You don't have to quote such long posts. Just quote the first sentence or so followed by " ......." then type whatever it is one has to say. :lol:

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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by Hairy biker » Wed May 22, 2013 5:27 am

I was trying to pass the link on to somebody else(such a fantastic write up by the way) but made a right F up of it, I've only just found this I didn't even know where it ended up! :lol:
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Wicky
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Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by Wicky » Wed May 22, 2013 7:35 am

Could you please edit your unintentional reply which confusingly duplicates all the pics etc. or perhaps the mods could do so - ta
It may be that your whole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

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seb421
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Joined: Fri Mar 06, 2009 1:06 am
Location: Bolton Lancs

Re: Manual Cam Chain Tensioner Installation Guide (MCCT's)

Post by seb421 » Wed May 22, 2013 10:16 am

Wicky wrote:Could you please edit your unintentional reply which confusingly duplicates all the pics etc. or perhaps the mods could do so - ta
Would have thought the would have made Carl a moderator by now seeing as he's been publishing lots of help guides and contributions....

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